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WEEK OF 1/29/2023

1 - Jay Bilas | 5%

2 - Sue Bird | Love/Hate

3 - Billy Donovan |

4 - JJ Reddick |

5 - Sue Bird | WHY ATHLETES DESERVE TO SPEAK UP


1 - Jay Bilas | 5%


Jay Bilas: Only 5% of athletes will go on to play beyond high school, so our requirement as coaches is to make that experience a positive one.


Whether you are the most knowledgeable Xs and Os coach on the planet or not, I don’t think players are going to hold you to that standard. They want to be treated right, and that doesn’t mean that you can’t coach them hard, but you have to treat them well and be invested in their well-being.

REFLECTION QUESTIONS


1 - What is your biggest takeaway from this video?

2 - What is the requirement of a high school coach?

3 - Can you coach kids hard AND treat them well?

4 - How do you hold a kid accountable and still let them know you love them and care about them?

2 - Sue Bird | LOVE/HATE


Sue Bird has won a joint-record four WNBA championships with the Storm (2004, 2010, 2018, 2020), a historic five Olympic gold medals (2004, 2008, 2012, 2016, and 2020), two NCAA Championships with UConn (2000, 2002); and four FIBA World Cups.


She played for the legendary college basketball coach, Geno Auriemma. She was asked, “When you were in college, did you like him?”


Sue Bird said, “It’s a love/hate. I feel like everybody with their college coach has these moments. He pushed; he’s a pusher. He pushes you to places that you didn’t know existed, but that is when you figure out what you are made of.


She also said: The best stories are the ones where someone got yelled at, somebody cried, somebody threw up, but for every one of those, there are 10 stories where something happened where he lifted you up or he had your back.

REFLECTION QUESTIONS


1 - What is your biggest takeaway from this video?

2 - Do you always like your coach? 3 - What do you want/expect from your coach?

4 - What are your best/favorite stories about the coaches you have had?

3 - Billy Donovan | HOW DO YOUR PLAYERS TALK ABOUT YOU


Billy Donovan won multiple championships as the men's basketball coach at the University of Florida. He was known for getting the most out of his athletes


Here is what he said about how we are measured as coaches:

"At the end of the day as coaches, we are measured on how our players talk. When your players have their own children, and they ask, "Who did you play for, and what were they like?" what they say about you is your legacy and what carries on.
The winning is all great, but at the end of the day, it really has a lot more to do with how your players talk about you when you are gone."

REFLECTION QUESTIONS


1 - What is your biggest takeaway from this video?

2 - How do you measure your success as a coach?

3 - What do you want your players to say about you when you are gone?

4 - What is more important: How many games do you win, or how do your players talk about you?

4 - JJ Reddick | MY OFF-SEASONS

JJ Reddick had a solid, 13-year career in the NBA. He was an elite shooter but never the biggest, strongest, or fastest. Reddick was a hard worker whose off-seasons were harder than the season.


He said:

“My off-seasons were harder than the seasons. My off-seasons were 6 days a week, 2 or 3 workouts a day, Saturdays off, and Sundays making 342 shots exactly every Sunday. There are 7 spots on the floor, so 20 spot 2s, 20 spot 3s, 3 dribbles going right, 3 dribbles going left, plus 20 free throws. I loved the process, and I loved everything that went into it.”

REFLECTION QUESTIONS

1 - What is your biggest takeaway from the video?

2 - How does your off-season work compare to JJ's?

3 - Knowing this, what changes will you make to your off-season work?

5 - Sue Bird | WHY ATHLETES DESERVE TO SPEAK UP


Sue Bird has won a joint-record four WNBA championships with the Storm (2004, 2010, 2018, 2020), a historic five Olympic gold medals (2004, 2008, 2012, 2016, and 2020), two NCAA Championships with UConn (2000, 2002); and four FIBA World Cups.


Many people on teams don’t like each other, but they make it work. Sue Bird says,


“This is why athletes deserve to speak on larger issues in our society - this is what we do. We sit in rooms with people we might not like, and we figure it out for the common good - for everyone; for everyone to feel good about it. There are a lot of times we don’t like each other, and sports get messy, and there are fights, but at the end of the day, you are the jerk when you don’t put the team first.”


REFLECTION QUESTIONS


1 - What is your biggest takeaway from the video?

2 - How can you sit in a locker room and play on a team with someone you might not like?

3 - How do you resolve conflicts and move forward when things get messy and there are fights?


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