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MANAGING ADVERSITY WITH TURBULENCE RESILIENCY


NBA head coach Doc Rivers once said, “Basketball is a game of runs.” Before every game, I tell my athletes, “In this game, we are going to do some really good things, and when we do, don’t get too high; keep making the next, right play. In this game, we will also do some terrible things, and when we do, don’t get too low; keep making the next, right play.”


Turbulence, characterized by conflict, disorder, or confusion, can either stop or create runs that impact games and championships. When something unexpected happens, how you manage it can determine your success and your legacy.


Resilience is your capacity to withstand or recover quickly from turbulence in a positive, helpful way.


Turbulence is when something bad happens in the game or life that causes stress to our mental, physical, or emotional health and well-being, and Turbulence Resiliency is your ability or capacity to manage that turbulence in a positive way and in a way that positively impacts the people you play with, work with and lead.


THERE ARE 4 STAGES OF MANAGING TURBULENCE


There are four stages of Turbulence Resiliency:


1 - STAGE 1 | THE PANIC STAGE


If you are in the panic stage when turbulence happens, you panic and bring down the plane and everyone with you.


2 - STAGE 2 | THE NEGATIVE STAGE


If you are in the negative stage, you might not panic, but your negative words, energy, and actions can set the group back. If the negativity is strong enough, this stage could be worse than the panic stage.


3 - STAGE 3 | THE NEUTRAL OR FREEZE STAGE


In the freeze or neutral stage, you freeze or stay neutral either voluntarily or involuntarily. You either freeze up like a deer caught in headlights or because you know how much negativity energy impacts the group, you choose to stay neutral until you can see the good in your situation.


4 - THE LIFT STAGE


This is the ideal stage. You feel and accept the turbulence but don’t let it negatively affect you or the team. You lift your team so that you all fly above the turbulence together and stay on track.


Self-awareness is the first step to managing turbulence effectively. What stage do you find yourself in when adversity hits? Which stage do you want to be in? How can you grow so that you can live in the stage you want to live in?


WHAT IS YOUR COPING STYLE


Facing turbulence and adversity can be a stressful, emotional experience. When we get hit with stress, our brains release chemicals through our bodies that create an adrenaline spike. Allostatic Load is when we get hit with more stress than we can handle and the demand doesn’t go away. This causes burnout and breakdowns. Have you ever been hit with so much stress at one time that you break down? That is a result of Allostatic Load.


Before this happens, learn what your default coping style is and how it can help you reset. There are 6 different coping styles:


1 - Fight | Aggressive problem-solving

2 - Flight | You run or escape from the problem

3 - Freeze | Slow or stall

4 - Focus | You focus on the next steps

5 - Spin | You jump from thing to thing6 - Robot-Mode | Show no emotions

7 - Helper-Mode | Gives advice

8 - Rabbit Hole | Going down a deep-dive


TAKE A BREAK


Sometimes, taking a break is the medicine you need. The break can be a long, extended break or a shorter 5-minute vacation:


MICRO-BREAK - A quick, 1-5 minute break may be all you need to reset.


MESO-BREAK - A slightly longer break, like a lunch or afternoon break may be what you need.


MACRO-BREAK - You might need a longer, more extended break like a vacation.


You can’t avoid turbulence, but you can build up your resistance so that you have the capacity to manage it better.


Know what your triggers and response to turbulence are, know what your most effective coping styles are, and then take breaks when needed so you have the physical, mental, and emotional energy to continue performing at your best when your best is required.


SOMETHING(s) TO THINK ABOUT


1 - What stage is your default stage? Do you default to the Panic, Negativity, Freeze, or Lift stage? 


2 - What stage do you want to live in, and what can you do to get there?


3 - What are your coping styles? In my experience, we usually have a combination of two default styles.


4 - How do you know when to take a break, and for how long?


For a printable PDF of this blog, click here: Managing Adversity with Turbulence Resilience

For a PDF 1-pager, click here: Flying Through Turbulence with Resilience


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